Projects for Electronics Enthusiasts

by Josh Fredman

    Many people have a fear of electricity. It acts faster than a human can respond to. It isn’t usually visible. It creates both shock and fire hazards, either of which can kill. And product manufacturers use all kinds of danger labels to discourage people from tinkering with electronic components. However, for as real as these dangers are, they can be managed by learning about electricity and respecting its power. By learning about electricity and playing with electronics in a knowledgeable, safe way, you can come to better appreciate this amazing force of nature and its applications for humankind.

    Homemade Lamp

    If you’ve never built one, lamps might seem a little bit like magic. You plug it in, flip a switch and light comes out. The principles behind electric lamps, however, are very easy to understand, and the design is as simple as connecting a wire to a socket, adding a switch and erecting a decorative lamp body around it. By building your own lamp you can learn a lot about the electrical wiring that powers your home, such as the components of typical electric cords and the gauge of wires. You will also end up with a useful, functional home appliance that you can say you built yourself.

    Homemade Radio

    Radio waves surround you. No matter where you are, you can be certain that radio waves are passing through you at this very moment, moving at light speed, dwelling on the Earth for only a fraction of a second before heading out into the cosmos. Radio waves and visible light consist of exactly the same stuff, except they have different energy levels. Our eyes can only see visible light, but our machines have no such limitation. Building your own radio can help you understand the natural world a little better. It also emphasizes the precision and subtlety of electrical engineering, making it a good introduction to understanding modern electronics. Radio parts and kits don’t cost a lot of money, and you will end up with an actual, working radio -- probably a bit crude, but definitely usable.

    Home Weather Station

    Thousands of weather enthusiasts around the country maintain their own home weather stations. Those who can comply with the necessary standards even have the opportunity to feed their weather data into any of several national networks that help forecasters at the National Weather Service and elsewhere get better at their jobs. While you could in theory build a weather station from scratch, you will get much better results and still have a great project if you buy manufactured weather instruments and then try to set them up into a working weather station. You’ll get to learn about how and where to position the various instruments, how to integrate them with your home computer and, if you want, how to feed the data to a weather information network. As with many electronics projects, you’ll get a tangible benefit too, in the form of real-time, high-quality weather data specific to your very own home.

    Homemade Synthesizer

    Synthesizers use electrical signals to generate audible tones. If you put a bunch of different tones next to each other, like on a piano keyboard, you can make music. Synthesizers caught on in the 1970s and 1980s and have remained popular ever since. They serve not only as a category of musical instruments but an artistic medium for the creation and destruction of sound. Building your own synthesizer makes for a much more advanced project, but you will learn a lot about electronic components and circuits along the way. Plenty of online communities and books exist to help you out, and when you finish you will have a working synthesizer.

    About the Author

    Josh Fredman is a freelance pen-for-hire and Web developer living in Seattle. He attended the University of Washington, studying engineering, and worked in logistics, health care and newspapers before deciding to go to work for himself.

    Photo Credits

    • Ryan McVay/Lifesize/Getty Images