Kindle Will Not Power On

by Shawn McClain
    Without power, your Kindle is reduced to a paperweight.

    Without power, your Kindle is reduced to a paperweight.

    Spencer Platt/Getty Images News/Getty Images

    You may find one day that your Kindle simply won't respond to the power button or switch, giving you a sinking feeling that the device is dead and all of your books, magazines, pictures and movies are lost. In reality, your Kindle may develop power issues for a number of reasons, including a bad power cord or a defective power button. Many of those issues can be solved through basic troubleshooting steps.

    Kindle Reset

    When Amazon developed the Kindle software, some issues like the device freezing during use and no longer powering on were anticipated, so workarounds were developed to help users remedy these problems. The Kindle's "hard reset" feature has the same effect as pulling out the battery for a few seconds and then reinstalling it; this forces the device to clear any memory problems that could be responsible for a malfunction and start over from the beginning. According to Amazon's documentation, all you need to do is hold down the power button, or hold the power slider to the right, for 20 seconds. Then release the power button or switch, and push it again to turn on the device. Some customers have reported that it may be necessary to hold the button or slider for significantly longer than 20 seconds. If the first solution doesn't work, hold the power button or slider for up to a minute, then release it and try to turn on the device.

    Power Issues

    If a software error isn't causing your Kindle's problem, the issue could reside in the hardware you are using to charge the device. When you plug your charger into the Kindle, the LED should turn yellow if the device is charging and green when the device is fully charged. If the light doesn't turn on at all, it definitely signals some kind of power issue. Replace the charging cord if possible. The Kindle uses a micro-USB port, so any micro-USB adapter such as those used commonly in mobile phones will charge the Kindle. If changing the cord doesn't help, change the power source. First, try a different outlet, and then try charging the Kindle by connecting it to a USB port on your computer or laptop. Finally, slowly wiggle the adapter where it enters the Kindle. If the charging port has come loose, this movement may cause the port to realign and the LED to illuminate. If this works, you may be able to hold the adapter at a certain angle to get your Kindle to charge and power on, but eventually, you'll need to have the device serviced.

    Hardware Failure

    Your Kindle may not be powering on because of a hardware failure. This failure may be on the actual circuit board, in the power button or switch, or even an unnoticed crack in the Kindle's display could make the device appear not turn on when, in fact, it just has no control of the screen. Hardware problems are difficult to pin down with basic troubleshooting, and fixing them is impossible without using specialized tools and voiding your warranty. If you believe that a hardware problem is preventing you from powering on the Kindle, contact Amazon for service assistance.

    Kindle Warranty Support

    Kindles are sold with a one-year limited warranty, which means Amazon will repair or replace your Kindle as long as the failure wasn't caused by accident, misuse, neglect, fire, alterations, repair or commercial use. To contact Amazon Kindle Support and begin the warranty repair process, visit the Kindle Support page on the Amazon website or call 1-866-321-8851.

    About the Author

    Shawn McClain has spent over 15 years as a journalist covering technology, business, culture and the arts. He has published numerous articles in both national and local publications, and online at various websites. He is currently pursuing his master's degree in journalism at Clarion University.

    Photo Credits

    • Spencer Platt/Getty Images News/Getty Images