How to Convert MP3 to Audio CD Format

by C. Taylor
    Speculative evidence suggest the original 74-minute CD's length was to accommodate Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

    Speculative evidence suggest the original 74-minute CD's length was to accommodate Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

    Zedcor Wholly Owned/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

    Converting your MP3 files to an audio CD allows compatibility with players that do not support MP3 files. Unfortunately, this compatibility drastically reduces the number of songs that will fit on a single CD. Modern CDs typically support 700MB of data or 80 minutes of music. The MP3 data format is limited by the data capacity, which means if a typical 3-minute song is 3MB in size, you can hold up to 233 songs. However, the audio CD format is limited by the length of the actual songs, so you could only fit 26 average 3-minute songs on the disc.

    Step 1

    Click the Start button, "All Programs" and then "Windows Media Player."

    Step 2

    Click the right pane's "Burn" tab.

    Step 3

    Click the "Burn Options" drop-down menu and select "Audio CD."

    Step 4

    Load a blank CD-R disc into your CD/DVD burner.

    Step 5

    Click "Clear List" to remove a previously created burn list. If no items appear in the burn list, the Clear List button will not be visible.

    Step 6

    Click the "Music" library from the left pane and locate the songs you wish to burn in the center Details pane.

    Step 7

    Drag and drop files from the Details pane to the Burn pane. As you add files, a cumulative total appears at the top of the list, such as "Disc 1 (##:##)." When the maximum CD length is reached, a "Disc 2 (##:##)" list is started. To make only a single CD, right-click songs and select "Remove From List" until only one list is displayed.

    Step 8

    Drag and drop files on the list to rearrange song order.

    Step 9

    Click "Start Burn" to burn your audio CD, which will take several minutes.

    About the Author

    C. Taylor has been a professional writer since 2009. He has written for online publications and the "Journal of Asian Martial Arts." Taylor specializes in martial arts, traveling, sciences and computer repair. He received a Master of Science in wildlife biology from Clemson University and a Bachelor of Arts in biological sciences from the College of Charleston.

    Photo Credits

    • Zedcor Wholly Owned/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images