How to Change the Name of a Wireless Network

by C. Taylor

    A wireless network's name is called the Service Set Identifier, or SSID, and can be up to 32 characters in length. By default, most wireless routers configure the SSID based on the router's name or manufacturer. This allows would-be hackers to fine-tune their efforts to your particular router. You shouldn't give potential data thieves this information, so changing your SSID removes that possibility. At the same time, a unique SSID name removes network confusion when numerous networks exist that share similar names.

    Step 1

    Connect an Ethernet cable from your computer's Ethernet port to any of the numbered ports on your wireless router.

    Step 2

    Open your browser and navigate to the router's IP address. If you don't know the IP address, press "Win-R" and enter "cmd" in the Run window. Type "ipconfig" without quotes in the Command Prompt window and look for the "Default Gateway," which should have a similar format to "192.168.0.1."

    Step 3

    Enter the login information and press "Enter." Most routers use the default username and password of "admin" and "password" or simply left blank. If you previously changed the defaults, use the updated login information.

    Step 4

    Look under the "Wireless Settings," "SSID" or "Security" section of the administrative utility to find the SSID information. On some routers, you may need to click "Wireless" and then select "Settings" or "SSID."

    Step 5

    Enter a new name in the SSID field.

    Step 6

    Click "Save Settings" or "Apply Changes."

    Tips

    • Your router may also offer the option to disable broadcasting of the SSID. This offers an addition layer of protection by disallowing users from seeing the network name. Instead, the network is displayed as "Other" and forces users to manually enter the SSID name.

    Warnings

    • Any current connections to the old SSID network name will be lost after changing the name, so you will have to manually reconnect. Likewise, if you've configured Windows to automatically connect to the network, it will no longer do so; you will need to add a new wireless network entry using the new name. The easiest way to do this is check "Connect Automatically" when choosing to connect to the new SSID network name.

    About the Author

    C. Taylor has been a professional writer since 2009. He has written for online publications and the "Journal of Asian Martial Arts." Taylor specializes in martial arts, traveling, sciences and computer repair. He received a Master of Science in wildlife biology from Clemson University and a Bachelor of Arts in biological sciences from the College of Charleston.

    Photo Credits

    • Thomas Northcut/Photodisc/Getty Images