How to Buy Plasma TV Accessories

by David Lipscomb Google

    Your new plasma television is capable of incredible details and color, making the most from Blu-ray and high definition broadcast sources. However, you need to connect the new set to your other components, mount it on the wall or a stand and protect it from surges. It's always important to examine the peripheral items required when purchasing a new plasma, especially if this is your first flat panel TV.

    Step 1

    Take stock of the devices you wish to connect to your new flat panel television. Determine which use HDMI, component video or other connections. Remember that you will need a separate audio cable to pair with any non-HDMI video connection. HDMI is preferred, offering the highest audio and video resolution, as well as cutting down on clutter.

    Step 2

    Look at the various wall-mount options for your plasma television. Take special care to select the wall mount that is rated for your television's weight. Examine your room's intended furniture layout to determine whether the set needs to swivel or tilt for the best viewing experience. Tilting a set down slightly if it faces a large window, for example helps deflect the reflections away from the viewer. You may want to extend and pivot the set for corner mounting, or viewing in an adjacent room.

    Step 3

    Consider stand-mounting your plasma TV, especially if you have numerous home theater components that need to be installed in close proximity to the set. Count up how many devices you have, as well as taking dimensional measurements, to see how much space the stand must provide. Measure the rack and the room prior to shopping to see if the unit takes up too much floor space, or interferes with typical traffic patterns. If you choose an armoire, remember to measure the internal dimensions of the furniture with the trap doors open and retracted, if it is so equipped.

    Step 4

    Examine the various surge protection options. Some protectors are specifically designed for flat panel televisions, mounting behind the set. Remember that if you have multiple components in the system, you'll need more outlets on the protector. In addition to more powerful electrical influxes, better surge protectors stop the small spikes from your neighbors and other appliances in your home, increasing television lifespan. Choose a surge protector that offers a connected device guarantee, along with a high Joule rating. Also, adding a universal power supply will keep the cooling fans running on the set in the case of a power outage, allowing the television to cool properly.

    Step 5

    Look at the various 3D options for your television, should it be compatible. Many manufacturers sell their 3D glasses as external accessories, necessitating a separate purchase. Remember that your Blu-ray player and home theater receiver must be 3D compatible for best results. You'll know your set is compatible from details in the user guide or if you engage a "3D" mode on the remote and the image suddenly looks blurry.

    Step 6

    Add a surround sound system or soundbar to the television to enhance the sound. Plasma televisions have tiny internal speakers for casual viewing, but they lack impact for today's high quality Blu-ray and DVD content. Nearly every television show broadcast today does so in 5.1 surround sound, which a television cannot reproduce on its own. Audio is half of the media system experience, adding emotion and drama to the on-screen action. Home theater systems require their own installation accessories, such as speaker wire and subwoofer cables.

    Step 7

    Add an infrared repeater system to relocate your home theater components to another room or adjacent closet. These kits allow you to use a remote control without the need to see the equipment. Teaming a flat panel with in-wall speakers and an IR repeater kit represents the pinnacle of sleek A/V performance, but may require professional installation services.

    Warnings

    • If mounting your plasma TV above a fireplace, place a thermometer on top of the mantle. If it reaches over 90 degrees Fahrenheit, look for another installation location.

    About the Author

    David Lipscomb is a professional writer and public relations practitioner. Lipscomb brings more than a decade of experience in the consumer electronics and advertising industries. Lipscomb holds a degree in public relations from Webster University.

    Photo Credits

    • Ethan Miller/Getty Images News/Getty Images